Special Section on Organic Light-Emitting Materials and Devices

Cheap p- and n-doping for highly efficient organic devices

[+] Author Affiliations
Ralf Krause, Frank Steinbacher, Günter Schmid, Jan Hauke Wemken, Arvid Hunze

Siemens AG, GTF Organic Electronics, Guenther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen, Germany

J. Photon. Energy. 1(1), 011022 (May 13, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3583639
History: Received August 13, 2010; Revised April 04, 2011; Accepted April 08, 2011; Published May 13, 2011; Online May 13, 2011
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Electrically doped, organic transport layers are important for today's high efficiency organic (opto-)electronic devices. Doped organic layers have a strongly increased free charge carrier density compared to their undoped counterparts and also improve the charge carrier injection from adjacent electrodes into the organics. For practical applications, especially in optoelectronics, these layers have to have low absorption in the wavelength range of interest. The two nearly colorless p- and n-doping materials, rhenium heptoxide and cesium carbonate, are investigated focusing on their conductivity enhancement, injection improvement, and voltage drop over doped transport layers in organic light emitting diodes. They show very good doping properties already at moderate doping concentrations and prove that they can be used in variable thicknesses without a significant voltage increase. This makes them cheap, low absorbing alternatives to today's, well-established doping systems.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Ralf Krause ; Frank Steinbacher ; Günter Schmid ; Jan Hauke Wemken and Arvid Hunze
"Cheap p- and n-doping for highly efficient organic devices", J. Photon. Energy. 1(1), 011022 (May 13, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3583639


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