Special Section on Organic Photovoltaics

Mixed solvents for reproducible photovoltaic bulk heterojunctions

[+] Author Affiliations
Zhongqiang Wang, Lintao Hou, Fengling Zhang, Olle Inganäs

Linköping University, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

Ergang Wang, Mats Andersson

Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering/Polymer Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden)

J. Photon. Energy. 1(1), 011122 (June 29, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3606393
History: Received December 22, 2010; Revised May 27, 2011; Accepted June 06, 2011; Published June 29, 2011; Online June 29, 2011
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Most efficient polymer solar cells are usually fabricated from toxic organic solvents, such as chloroform, chlorobenzene, or dichlorobenzene (ODCB). Here, we demonstrate a power conversion efficiency of 4.5% in solar cells with a new blue polymer poly[2,3-bis-(3-octyloxyphenyl)quinoxaline-5,8-diyl-alt-thiophene-2,5-diyl] (TQ1) mixed with PC71BM and processed from mixed solvents of toluene and ODCB in a ratio of 9:1. Decreasing the content of ODCB makes device processing more compatible with the environment for large scale production, with 10% reduction of photocurrent compared to devices from pure ODCB under optimized conditions. In addition, less variation of photocurrent is obtained in solar cells processed from mixed solvents than from pure ODCB due to varying nanostructure in the blends, which is also critical for production.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Zhongqiang Wang ; Ergang Wang ; Lintao Hou ; Fengling Zhang ; Mats Andersson, et al.
"Mixed solvents for reproducible photovoltaic bulk heterojunctions", J. Photon. Energy. 1(1), 011122 (June 29, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3606393


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