Light Management

One-axis tracking holographic planar concentrator systems

[+] Author Affiliations
Deming Zhang, Jose M. Castro

University of Arizona, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, 1230 East Speedway Boulevard, Tucson, Arizona 85721

Raymond K. Kostuk

University of Arizona, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, 1230 East Speedway Boulevard, Tucson, Arizona 85721

College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, 1630 East University Boulevard, Tucson, Arizona 85721

J. Photon. Energy. 1(1), 015505 (May 17, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3590943
History: Received December 02, 2010; Revised April 21, 2011; Accepted April 26, 2011; Published May 17, 2011; Online May 17, 2011
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A design methodology for low-concentration ratio holographic solar concentrators with one-axis tracking is investigated. This methodology maximizes the energy collected by cascaded holographic gratings and reduces diffracted beam cross talk between gratings. Several types of transmission gratings, optimized to work with single-axis tracking systems, are used in a cascaded configuration to concentrate a large fraction of the useable solar spectrum on the surface of photovoltaic cells. A model is developed that determines the energy yield of the holographic planar concentrator (HPC). Good agreement is found between simulation and measurement of a prototype system. Simulation of an optimized HPC design shows that 80% optical efficiency at 2X geometric concentration ratio is possible. The acceptance angle in the nontracking direction is ±65 deg, and a ±16-deg tracking tolerance is sufficient to maintain 80% of the maximum optical efficiency. Simulation also shows that the single-axis tracking HPC system has a 43.8% increase in energy yield compared to a nontracking holographic solar concentrator.

© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Deming Zhang ; Jose M. Castro and Raymond K. Kostuk
"One-axis tracking holographic planar concentrator systems", J. Photon. Energy. 1(1), 015505 (May 17, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3590943


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