Special Section on Organic Photovoltaics

Charge photogeneration in donor/acceptor organic solar cells

[+] Author Affiliations
Safa Shoaee, Tracey M. Clarke, Mattias P. Eng, James R. Durrant

Imperial College London, Centre for Plastic Electronics, Department of Chemistry, London, SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom

Chun Huang, Stephen Barlow, Seth R. Marder

Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, 901 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0400

Eva Espíldora

Facultad de Quimica Universidad Complutense, Departamento de Quimica Organica, E-28040 Madrid, Spain

Juan Luis Delgado, Nazario Martín

Facultad de Quimica Universidad Complutense, Departamento de Quimica Organica, E-28040 Madrid, Spain

Ciudad Universitaria de Cantoblanco, IMDEA-Nanociencia, Facultad de Ciencias, Módulo C-IX, 3a planta, E-28049 Madrid, Spain

Bert Campo, Dirk Vanderzande

Institute for Materials Research, Campus Diepenbeek, Division Chemistry, Agoralaan Gebouw D, BE 3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium

Martin Heeney

Chilworth Science Park, Merck Chemicals, Southampton SO16 7QD, United Kingdom

University of London, Department of Materials, Queen Mary, EI 4NS, United Kingdom

Iain McCulloch

Imperial College London, Centre for Plastic Electronics, Department of Chemistry, London, SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom

Chilworth Science Park, Merck Chemicals, Southampton SO16 7QD, United Kingdom

J. Photon. Energy. 2(1), 021001 (Mar 12, 2012). doi:10.1117/1.JPE.2.021001
History: Received October 5, 2011; Revised November 16, 2011; Accepted December 1, 2011
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Abstract.  We focus upon the role of interfacial energetics and morphology in influencing the separation of CT states into dissociated charge carriers. In particular, we undertake transient optical studies of films comprising regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) blended with a series of perylene-3,4:9,10-tetracarboxydiimide (PDI) fullerene electron acceptors. For the PDI film series, we observe a close correlation between the PDI electron affinity and the efficiency of charge separation. This correlation is discussed in the context of studies of charge photogeneration for other organic donor/acceptor blend films, including other polymers, blend compositions, and the widely used electron phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester(PCBM). Furthermore, we compare the charge recombination dynamics observed in films comprising P3HT blended with three fullerene derivatives: PCBM and two alternative pyrazolinofullerenes. Transient absorption data indicate that replacement of PCBM with either of the pyrazolinofullerene derivatives results in a transition from nongeminate to monomolecular (geminate) recombination dynamics. We show that this transition cannot be explained by a difference in interfacial energetics. However, this transition does correlate with nanomorphology data that indicate that both pyrazolinofullerenes yield a much finer phase segregation with correspondingly smaller domain sizes than observed with PCBM. Our results therefore provide clear evidence of the role of nanomorphology in determining the nature of recombination dynamics in such donor/acceptor blends.

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© 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Safa Shoaee ; Tracey M. Clarke ; Mattias P. Eng ; Chun Huang ; Stephen Barlow, et al.
"Charge photogeneration in donor/acceptor organic solar cells", J. Photon. Energy. 2(1), 021001 (Mar 12, 2012). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JPE.2.021001


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