Advanced Concepts and Applications

Optical properties of boride ultrahigh-temperature ceramics for solar thermal absorbers

[+] Author Affiliations
Elisa Sani, Marco Meucci, Luca Mercatelli, David Jafrancesco

CNR-INO, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Firenze 50125, Italy

Jean-Louis Sans

PROMES-CNRS Processes, Materials and Solar Energy Laboratory, Font Romeu 66120, France

Laura Silvestroni, Diletta Sciti

CNR-ISTEC, Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali Ceramici, 48018 Faenza, Italy

J. Photon. Energy. 4(1), 045599 (Feb 18, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JPE.4.045599
History: Received December 20, 2013; Revised January 13, 2014; Accepted January 24, 2014
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Abstract.  It is a known rule that the efficiency of thermodynamic solar plants increases with the working temperature. At present, the main limit in temperature upscaling is the absorber capability to withstand high temperatures. The ideal solar absorber works at high temperatures and has both a low thermal emissivity and a high absorptivity in the solar spectral range. The present work reports on the preparation and optical characterization of hafnium and zirconium diboride ultrahigh-temperature ceramics for innovative solar absorbers operating at high temperature. Spectral hemispherical reflectance from the ultraviolet to the mid-infrared wavelength region and high-temperature hemispherical emittance reveal their potential for high-temperature solar applications. Boride samples are compared with silicon carbide (SiC), a material already used in solar furnaces.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Elisa Sani ; Marco Meucci ; Luca Mercatelli ; David Jafrancesco ; Jean-Louis Sans, et al.
"Optical properties of boride ultrahigh-temperature ceramics for solar thermal absorbers", J. Photon. Energy. 4(1), 045599 (Feb 18, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JPE.4.045599


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