Light-Emitting Materials, Devices, and Technologies

High efficiency white organic light emitting diodes employing blue and red platinum emitters

[+] Author Affiliations
Barry O’Brien

Arizona State University, Department of Material Science, Tempe, Arizona 85284

Arizona State University, Flexible Display Center, 7700 South River Parkway, Tempe, Arizona 85284

Gregory Norby, Guijie Li

Arizona State University, Department of Material Science, Tempe, Arizona 85284

Jian Li

Arizona State University, Department of Material Science, Tempe, Arizona 85284

Arizona State University, Flexible Display Center, 7700 South River Parkway, Tempe, Arizona 85284

J. Photon. Energy. 4(1), 043597 (Apr 11, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JPE.4.043597
History: Received December 28, 2013; Revised March 5, 2014; Accepted March 6, 2014
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Abstract.  Platinum-based blue and red emitters were used to make stacked organic light-emitting diodes devices for potential use in solid-state lighting. The electroluminescence (EL) spectra were strongly dependent on the red layer thickness and relative position of the red and blue emissive layers. Although all devices had very little EL in the green region, a color rendering index (CRI) as high as 65 was achieved. Addition of a suitable phosphorescent green emissive layer should produce higher CRI values. All devices tested exhibited external quantum efficiencies greater than 20%, indicating that the Pt-based emitters reported here are potentially useful for solid-state lighting applications.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Barry O’Brien ; Gregory Norby ; Guijie Li and Jian Li
"High efficiency white organic light emitting diodes employing blue and red platinum emitters", J. Photon. Energy. 4(1), 043597 (Apr 11, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JPE.4.043597


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