Materials Synthesis, Deposition, and Processing

Photoelectrochemical performance of W-doped BiVO4 thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis

[+] Author Affiliations
S. Keith Holland

James Madison University, College of Integrated Science and Engineering, Department of Engineering, 801 Carrier Drive MSC 4113, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22807

James Madison University, Center for Materials Science, 901 Carrier Drive MSC 4502, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22807

Melissa R. Dutter

James Madison University, College of Integrated Science and Engineering, Department of Engineering, 801 Carrier Drive MSC 4113, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22807

David J. Lawrence

James Madison University, Center for Materials Science, 901 Carrier Drive MSC 4502, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22807

James Madison University, College of Integrated Science and Engineering, Department of Integrated Science and Technology, 701 Carrier Drive MSC 4102, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22807

Barbara A. Reisner

James Madison University, Center for Materials Science, 901 Carrier Drive MSC 4502, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22807

James Madison University, College of Science and Mathematics, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 901 Carrier Drive MSC 4501, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22807

Thomas C. DeVore

James Madison University, Center for Materials Science, 901 Carrier Drive MSC 4502, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22807

James Madison University, College of Science and Mathematics, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 901 Carrier Drive MSC 4501, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22807

J. Photon. Energy. 4(1), 041598 (Jun 20, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JPE.4.041598
History: Received March 14, 2014; Revised May 20, 2014; Accepted May 22, 2014
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Abstract.  The effects of tungsten doping and hydrogen annealing on the photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance of bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) photoanodes for solar water splitting were studied. Thin films of BiVO4 were deposited on indium tin oxide-coated glass slides by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis of an aqueous solution containing bismuth nitrate and vanadium oxysulfate. Tungsten doping was achieved by adding either silicotungstic acid (STA) or ammonium metatungstate (AMT) to the precursor. The 1.7- to 2.2-μm-thick films exhibited a highly porous microstructure. Undoped films that were reduced at 375°C in 3% H2 exhibited the largest photocurrent densities under 0.1Wcm2 AM1.5 illumination, where photocurrent densities of up to 1.3mAcm2 at 0.5 V with respect to Ag/AgCl were achieved. Films doped with 1% or 5% (atomic percent) tungsten from either STA or AMT exhibited reduced PEC performance and greater sample-to-sample performance variations. Powder x-ray diffraction data indicated that the films continue to crystallize in the monoclinic polymorph at low doping levels but crystallize in the tetragonal scheelite structure at higher doping. It is surmised that the phase and morphology differences promoted by the addition of W during the deposition process reduced the PEC performance as measured by photovoltammetry.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

S. Keith Holland ; Melissa R. Dutter ; David J. Lawrence ; Barbara A. Reisner and Thomas C. DeVore
"Photoelectrochemical performance of W-doped BiVO4 thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis", J. Photon. Energy. 4(1), 041598 (Jun 20, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JPE.4.041598


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