Photovoltaic Materials, Devices, and Technologies

Dye-sensitized solar cell using natural dyes extracted from Morus atba Lam fruit and Striga hermonthica flower

[+] Author Affiliations
Abebe Reda

Bahir Dar University, College of Sciences, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 79, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia

Sisay Tadesse

Hawassa University, College of Natural and Computational Sciences, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 05, Hawassa, Ethiopia

Teketel Yohannes

Addis Ababa University, College of Natural Sciences, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

J. Photon. Energy. 4(1), 043091 (Sep 03, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JPE.4.043091
History: Received March 18, 2014; Revised July 12, 2014; Accepted July 15, 2014
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Abstract.  This study employs anthocyanin extracts from mulberry (Morus atba Lam) fruit and Akenchira (Striga hermonthica) flower as the natural dyes for a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). The electrodes, electrolyte (I/I3), and dyes were assembled into a cell and illuminated by a light with an intensity 100mW/cm2 to measure the photoelectrochemical parameters of the prepared DSSCs. According to the experimental results, the maximum conversion efficiency of the DSSCs prepared from anthocyanin dyes of Morus atba Lam fruit extract is 0.42%, with an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.54 V, a short circuit current density (Jsc) of 1.38mA/cm2, and a fill factor (FF) of 0.56. The maximum conversion efficiency of the DSSCs prepared by anthocyanin dye from the flower of S. hermonthica extract is 0.304% with a Voc of 0.52 V, Jsc of 1.01mA/cm2, and an FF of 0.58.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Abebe Reda ; Sisay Tadesse and Teketel Yohannes
"Dye-sensitized solar cell using natural dyes extracted from Morus atba Lam fruit and Striga hermonthica flower", J. Photon. Energy. 4(1), 043091 (Sep 03, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JPE.4.043091


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