Light-Emitting Materials, Devices, and Technologies

Improvement of device efficiency for blue organic light emitting diodes by controlling the Cs2CO3-doped electron transport layer

[+] Author Affiliations
Richard Fu, Jianmin Shi, Eric Forsythe, Steven Blomquist, Merric Srour, David Morton

U.S. Army Research Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, Maryland 20783-1138, United States

J. Photon. Energy. 4(1), 043595 (Sep 24, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JPE.4.043595
History: Received July 8, 2014; Revised August 15, 2014; Accepted September 5, 2014
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Abstract.  The electronic transport properties of 1, 3, 5-tri(1-phenyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenyl (TPBI) electron transporting layers (ETLs) have been investigated as a function of cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) doping for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The current density-voltage and light emission characteristics were measured as a function of the Cs2CO3-doped ETL thickness. Cs2CO3-doped TPBI decreased OLED operating voltage by 26% and increased device luminance by 17% in a wide concentration range (3.5% to 10.5%) compared to undoped devices. The effects of 7% Cs2CO3-doped ETL thickness indicated that the operating voltage continuously decreased to 37% when the ETL thickness increased to 600 Å and luminance output continued to increase to 21% at ETL thickness 525 Å. The blue OLED can be optimized by adjusting the thicknesses of Cs2CO3-doped TPBI ETL to balance the electron and hole injection.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Richard Fu ; Jianmin Shi ; Eric Forsythe ; Steven Blomquist ; Merric Srour, et al.
"Improvement of device efficiency for blue organic light emitting diodes by controlling the Cs2CO3-doped electron transport layer", J. Photon. Energy. 4(1), 043595 (Sep 24, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JPE.4.043595


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