Special Section on Solution-Processable Organic Solar Cells

Charge transfer state energy in ternary bulk-heterojunction polymer–fullerene solar cells

[+] Author Affiliations
Sandra Kouijzer, Weiwei Li, Martijn M. Wienk, René A. J. Janssen

Eindhoven University of Technology, Institute of Complex Molecular Systems, Molecular Materials and Nanosystems, PO Box 513, Eindhoven, Netherlands 5600 MB

J. Photon. Energy. 5(1), 057203 (Dec 10, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JPE.5.057203
History: Received September 28, 2014; Accepted November 6, 2014
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Abstract.  In ternary bulk heterojunction solar cells based on a semiconducting biphenyl-dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole copolymer donor and two different fullerene acceptors that distinctly differ in electron affinity, the open-circuit voltage is found to depend in a slightly sublinear fashion on the relative ratio of the two fullerenes in the blend. Similar effects have previously been observed and have been attributed to the formation of an alloyed fullerene phase possessing electronic levels that are the weighted average of the two components. By analyzing the contribution of the charge transfer (CT)-state absorption to the external quantum efficiency of the ternary blend solar cells as a function of composition, we find no evidence for a CT state formed between the polymer and an alloyed fullerene phase. Rather, the results are consistent with the presence of two distinct CT states, one for each polymer–fullerene combination. The two-state CT model does not, however, explain the sublinear behavior of the open-circuit voltage as a function of the blend composition.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Sandra Kouijzer ; Weiwei Li ; Martijn M. Wienk and René A. J. Janssen
"Charge transfer state energy in ternary bulk-heterojunction polymer–fullerene solar cells", J. Photon. Energy. 5(1), 057203 (Dec 10, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JPE.5.057203


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