Special Section on Solution-Processable Organic Solar Cells

Synthesis and photovoltaic response of a solution-processable dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole-based molecular semiconductor with thienylvinylthienyl endgroups

[+] Author Affiliations
Chun-Hui Zhang, Wan-Yi Tan, Li-Ping Wang, Qing-Duan Li, Rui Zhou, Ju Huang, Xin-Feng Wei, Yan Xia, Yi-Feng He

South China University of Technology (SCUT), Institute of Polymer Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, 381 Wushan Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640, China

Xu-Hui Zhu

South China University of Technology (SCUT), Institute of Polymer Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, 381 Wushan Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640, China

Junbiao Peng

South China University of Technology (SCUT), Institute of Polymer Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, 381 Wushan Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640, China

Yong Cao

South China University of Technology (SCUT), Institute of Polymer Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, 381 Wushan Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640, China

J. Photon. Energy. 5(1), 057211 (Jan 28, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JPE.5.057211
History: Received October 30, 2014; Accepted December 4, 2014
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Abstract.  We describe the synthesis and preliminary photovoltaic performance of a solution-processable organic small-molecule electron donor DT-DPP(TVT)2 that consists of dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole (DT-DPP) as the core and thienylvinylthiophene (TVT) as the endgroups. The new compound is a crystalline solid with a Tm of approximately 216°C. Cyclic voltammetry indicates that DT-DPP(TVT)2 exhibits two quasi-reversible one-electron oxidation waves at ca. 0.68 and 0.90 V versus an Ag/AgCl reference electrode, respectively, leading to an estimated highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level of about 5.08eV. Introducing the branched 2-hexyldecyl side chain provides DT-DPP(TVT)2 with a high solubility in chloroform up to ca. 36mgmL1 at room temperature. Thermal annealing increases the crystallinity of the as-cast film from chloroform solution, thereby rendering slightly red-shifted charge-transfer absorption maxima. Fitting the space-charge-limited current characteristics of the thermally annealed thin film yields an improved hole mobility of 2.14×104cm2V1s1 at low voltages versus 1.46×104cm2V1s1 of the as-cast film. A first characterization of the solar cell [ITO/PEDOT: PSS/DT-DPP(TVT)2: PC61BM/Al] produces a power conversion efficiency of 3% with VOC0.78V, JSC7.91mAcm2, and FF48.7%, under simulated AM1.5G with an illumination intensity of 100mWcm2. It should be noted that the thermal effect on the thin film absorption of DT-DPP(TVT)2 does not seem to be completely similar to the molecular donor DPP(TFNa)2 reported earlier, which bears 6-fluoronaphthyl endgroups.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Chun-Hui Zhang ; Wan-Yi Tan ; Li-Ping Wang ; Qing-Duan Li ; Rui Zhou, et al.
"Synthesis and photovoltaic response of a solution-processable dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole-based molecular semiconductor with thienylvinylthienyl endgroups", J. Photon. Energy. 5(1), 057211 (Jan 28, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JPE.5.057211


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