Photovoltaic Materials, Devices, and Technologies

Silicon on glass grown from indium and tin solutions

[+] Author Affiliations
Roman Bansen, Christian Ehlers, Thomas Teubner, Klaus Böttcher, Jan Schmidtbauer, Torsten Boeck

Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth, Max-Born-Straße 2, 12489 Berlin, Germany

Karen Gambaryan

Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Street, Yerevan 0025, Armenia

J. Photon. Energy. 6(2), 025501 (May 04, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JPE.6.025501
History: Received February 11, 2016; Accepted April 4, 2016
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Abstract.  A two-step process is used to grow crystalline silicon (c-Si) on glass at low temperatures. In the first step, nanocrystalline seed layers are formed at temperatures in the range of 230 to 400°C by either metal-induced crystallization or by direct deposition on heated substrates. In the second step, c-Si is grown on the seed layer by steady-state liquid phase epitaxy at a temperature range of 580 to 710°C. Microcrystalline Si layers with grain sizes of up to several tens of micrometers are grown from In and Sn solutions. Three-dimensional simulations of heat and convective flow in the crucible have been conducted and give valuable insights into the growth process. The experimental results are promising with regard to the designated use of the material in photovoltaics.

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© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Roman Bansen ; Christian Ehlers ; Thomas Teubner ; Klaus Böttcher ; Karen Gambaryan, et al.
"Silicon on glass grown from indium and tin solutions", J. Photon. Energy. 6(2), 025501 (May 04, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JPE.6.025501


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