Light Management

Funneling and guiding effects in ultrathin aSi-H solar cells using one-dimensional dielectric subwavelength gratings

[+] Author Affiliations
Mahmoud H. Elshorbagy

University Complutense of Madrid, Applied Optics Complutense Group, Faculty of Optics and Optometry, Madrid, Spain

Minia University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, El-Minya, Egypt

Javier Alda

University Complutense of Madrid, Applied Optics Complutense Group, Faculty of Optics and Optometry, Madrid, Spain

J. Photon. Energy. 7(1), 017002 (Mar 09, 2017). doi:10.1117/1.JPE.7.017002
History: Received November 24, 2016; Accepted February 10, 2017
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Abstract.  Ultrathin amorphous silicon hydrogenated (aSi-H) solar cells grown on a one-dimensional (1-D) dielectric subwavelength gratings improve the short circuit current by a factor of more than 51% when compared with conventional, flat ultrathin aSi-H devices. This improvement is possible due to several mechanisms. In addition the increase in exposed area caused by the nanostructured surface, a reliable computational electromagnetic evaluation of the interaction of the solar spectrum with the cell structure demonstrates that absorption at the active layer is enhanced and also reflectivity is decreased. In addition, the absorbed power at the nonactive layers is larger, helping to increase the temperature and mitigate the Staebler–Wronski effect. The detailed analysis of the power flux inside the structure has also shown that funneling and guiding mechanism are at play, increasing the optical path within the active layer that produces a better performance of the cell.

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© 2017 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Mahmoud H. Elshorbagy and Javier Alda
"Funneling and guiding effects in ultrathin aSi-H solar cells using one-dimensional dielectric subwavelength gratings", J. Photon. Energy. 7(1), 017002 (Mar 09, 2017). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JPE.7.017002


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