Photovoltaic Materials, Devices, and Technologies

Accelerated degradation testing of a photovoltaic module

[+] Author Affiliations
Abdérafi Charki

University of Angers, LASQUO-ISTIA, 62 Avenue Notre Dame du Lac, 49000 Angers, France

Rémi Laronde

University of Angers, LASQUO-ISTIA, 62 Avenue Notre Dame du Lac, 49000 Angers, France

David Bigaud

University of Angers, LASQUO-ISTIA, 62 Avenue Notre Dame du Lac, 49000 Angers, France

J. Photon. Energy. 3(1), 033099 (Mar 11, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JPE.3.033099
History: Received March 3, 2012; Revised January 18, 2013; Accepted February 14, 2013
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Abstract.  There are a great many photovoltaic (PV) modules installed around the world. Despite this, not enough is known about the reliability of these modules. Their electrical power output decreases with time mainly as a result of the effects of corrosion, encapsulation discoloration, and solder bond failure. The failure of a PV module is defined as the point where the electrical power degradation reaches a given threshold value. Accelerated life tests (ALTs) are commonly used to assess the reliability of a PV module. However, ALTs provide limited data on the failure of a module and these tests are expensive to carry out. One possible solution is to conduct accelerated degradation tests. The Wiener process in conjunction with the accelerated failure time model makes it possible to carry out numerous simulations and thus to determine the failure time distribution based on the aforementioned threshold value. By this means, the failure time distribution and the lifetime (mean and uncertainty) can be evaluated.

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© 2013 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Abdérafi Charki ; Rémi Laronde and David Bigaud
"Accelerated degradation testing of a photovoltaic module", J. Photon. Energy. 3(1), 033099 (Mar 11, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JPE.3.033099


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